• A vision of what the beach could be, based on engineering descriptions.
    The Memorial Beach Vision
    A vision of what Kaimana Beach could be...
  • An aerial view of the Natatorium as it exists today.
    The Crumbling Natatorium
    ...the Natatorium in 2004...
  • The Crumbling Natatorium
    ...the Natatorium in 2012. Image: Google Maps
  • A rendering of what the Memorial could be. Image from the City & County of Honolulu.
    The Memorial Beach Vision
    Image: City & County of Honolulu
  • A rendering of what the beach could be. Image from the City & County of Honolulu.
    The Memorial Beach Vision
    Image: City & County of Honolulu

New beach best idea for Natatorium future


The following is a letter to the editor published in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser, August 7, 2016.

In a debate last week, Honolulu mayoral candidates were asked what to do with the Natatorium.

Charles Djou said, “Renovate.”

The city’s estimated cost for a full renovation: $70 million, plus the high ongoing costs of complying with modern anti-MRSA health standards.

Peter Carlisle said keep whatever can be saved, an idea fraught with many problems identified by the blue ribbon Natatorium Task Force in 2009.

Mayor Kirk Caldwell said he would follow the Natatorium environmental impact statement process, which is testing the task force’s recommendation: create a new memorial beach where the Natatorium now stands. This would involve rebuilding the three memorial arches 50 feet inland, and recreating groins to protect Kaimana and the new beach.

We favor this sensible $17 million plan for its obvious cost-effectiveness, preservation of free, open public shoreline, elimination of maintenance expenses, and two new acres of stable beach.

Rick Bernstein
Jim Bickerton
Kaimana Beach Coalition



Caldwell Offers A New Multimillion-Dollar Option For Natatorium

Civil Beat, December 11, 2017 by Marcel Honore Caldwell Offers A New Multimillion-Dollar Option For Natatorium A solution is years away, but the mayor wants people to know “we haven’t forgot” the dilapidated World War I memorial. For several years now, there have been two basic options for what to do with the Waikiki Natatorium: “pool” or “beach.” Either restore the dilapidated World War I memorial and its saltwater pool, which has languished for decades, or move its distinct arches away from th
Continue Reading →

City outlines potential options for future of Waikiki Natatorium

KHON, December 11, 2017 City outlines potential options for future of Waikiki Natatorium What should happen to the Waikiki Natatorium War Memorial? Construction was completed in 1927 as a memorial to honor veterans of World War I. But over the past several decades, the facility fell into disrepair. It’s been closed to the public since 1979, and is considered a public health and safety issue for beachgoers and marine life. On Monday, city officials outlined several possibilities for the landmark’
Continue Reading →

Natatorium EIS Update December 2017

On December 11, 2017 Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell held a press conference to update the press and public on the state of the Natatorium’s EIS process as well as the full set of alternatives that will be considered in the EIS to date. The following is a transcription of the video as provided by Civil Beat. Transcription provided by the Kaimana Beach Coalition. Images of the alternatives as well as a summary of their costs can be viewed in the article provided by KHON. Kirk Caldwell: I want
Continue Reading →

Monk seal pup reunited with mom after getting trapped in the Natatorium

Honolulu Star-Advertiser, July 28, 2017 (Updated July 29, 2017 5:25pm) / By Leila Fukimori - Kaimana, the 4-week-old monk seal pup born at Kaimana Beach in Waikiki, wandered away for the first time from her Kauai-born mom, “Rocky,” Friday night. The two were separated for about 40 to 50 minutes when Kaimana took a dip at the Waikiki Natatorium, while Rocky kept calling out for her baby girl.
Continue Reading →

Remembering and Forgetting at The Waikiki War Memorial Park and Natatorium

This paper was written by historian Brian Ireland and published in The Hawaiian Journal of History, Volume 39 in 2005. His extensive research found that during World War I only eight Hawai‘i residents actually died by enemy action overseas. He examines the memorial's contentious, colonialist beginnings and questionable symbolism within its historical context.
Continue Reading →